Wells Fargo Extends African American History Tour, Brings The Kinsey Collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey, Where Art and History Intersect Exhibition to Atlanta and Houston

CNN/Stylemagazine.com Newswire | 3/20/2014, 10:39 a.m.
As the nation commemorates the Civil War Sesquicentennial and the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, ...
  • Tour poised to dispel myths, encourage dialogue and promote storytelling around African Americans in the making of America -

As the nation commemorates the Civil War Sesquicentennial and the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, Wells Fargo (NYSE: WFC) announces the extension of its national African American history celebratory tour through 2014, featuring renowned exhibition, The Kinsey Collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey, Where Art and History Intersect.

The Kinsey Collection chronicles more than four hundred years of the contributions made by African Americans in American history. The collection includes artifacts and works of art demonstrating the artistic, historic, and cultural contributions and progress of African Americans. The exhibition features documents, artifacts, and photographs dating from 1600 to the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow years, and the Civil Rights Movement.

The exhibition has been seen at the Smithsonian Institution and 14 other venues, but never before in Atlanta or Huston. As part of Wells Fargo’s 2013 celebratory tour honoring the 150th anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation, it traveled to leading African American museums including the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco, the Harvey B. Gantt Center in Charlotte, and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum in Baltimore.

This year, the exhibition will contain more than 130 items, featuring never before displayed artifacts, including: a first edition of Solomon Northrup’s 12 Years a Slave, the basis of the Academy Award-winning film; W.E.B Dubois 1st edition copy of his ground breaking book Souls of Black Folks; and the earliest known African-American marriage record dating back to 1598.

Through these objects, The Kinsey Collection seeks to dispel myths and promote dialogue about the role of African Americans in the making of America. Wells Fargo invites visitors of the collection to contemplate the items displayed and to reflect on the progress that African Americans have made in civil rights and social justice, as well as consider the work remaining to achieve equality.

“Wells Fargo is excited to extend our national tour in collaboration with the Kinsey family. We are committed to sharing the stories of African Americans to recognize the heroes, and their collective experiences, which have helped define the American story,” says Lisa Frison, Wells Fargo, vice president, African American segment manager.

The role of African Americans in the art and culture of early America was far richer than commonly thought – a contribution that has endured and flourished. At the same time, the end of slavery with the Civil War did not end the exploitation, violence, and neglect of the previously e Civil War Sesquicentennial and the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act enslaved and their descendants. Only through strength and commitment to social justice did African Americans secure their civil and human rights as a result of the Civil Rights Movement and passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Bernard Kinsey, avid collector, philanthropist, and educator, began this collection over 35 years ago with his wife, Shirley, and son, Khalil. Bernard was inspired to begin his collection after viewing an original bill of sale of William Johnson sold for $550 in 1832.