OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network to Air WOrld Premiere of "Light Girls" Monday, January 19 at 9PM ET/PT

Bill Duke-Produced Documentary Explores Advantages and Disadvantages of Lighter-Skinned Women Around the World

Jo-Carolyn Goode | 1/15/2015, 3:44 p.m.
OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network will air the world premiere of “Light Girls” on Monday, January 19 at 9 p.m. – ...
“Light Girls” airs January 19 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network Photo Credit: OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network

Los Angeles – OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network will air the world premiere of “Light Girls” on Monday, January 19 at 9 p.m. – 11 p.m. ET/PT.

The critically acclaimed documentary “Dark Girls” aired on the network last year, and award-winning filmmaker Bill Duke continues the conversation on colorism with “Light Girls,” sharing an in-depth study of the advantages and disadvantages of being a lighter-skinned woman as seen through the eyes of notable entertainers, educators and everyday people.

The film highlights and questions the notion that “light skin makes for an easier life” and provides a global analysis of skin color and its relationship with societal values. It boldly dives into topics such as bullying, skin bleaching and the trending social media separation, #teamlightskin versus #teamdarkskin.

The documentary features interviews with Russell Simmons, Soledad O'Brien, Diahann Carroll, India Arie, Iyanla Vanzant, Michaela Angela Davis, Essence Atkins, Kym Whitley, Raven Salli Richardson-Whitfield and more.

The Colorism Conversation Continues in “Light Girls”

Iyanla Vanzant, Michaela Angela Davis, Essence Atkins and many more speak out about bullying and the trending separation between #teamlightskin and #teamdarkskin on social media.

Oprah.com

LIGHT GIRLS: The Colorism Conversation Continues in Light Girls Read more: http://www.oprah.com/own-lightgirls/The-Colorism-Conversation-Continues-i

From the creator and director of the critically acclaimed documentary Dark Girls, filmmaker Bill Duke continues the conversation on colorism, and questions the notion that light skin makes for an easier life. Iyanla Vanzant, Raven-Symoné, Erica Hubbard, Michaela Angela Davis and many more speak out about bullying, skin bleaching and the trending separation between #teamlightskin and #teamdarkskin on social media. Tune in Monday, January 19, at 9/8c. Read more: http://www.oprah.com/own-lightgirls/The-Colorism-Conversation-Continues-in-Light-Girls-Video##ixzz3OvcB4RiR

Iyanla Vanzant, Chante Moore, Essence Atkins and More Share Experiences of Colorism as Light-Skinned Women

In the documentary “Light Girls,” African-American actresses and media personalities born with lighter complexions recount painful childhood memories.

Oprah.com

LIGHT GIRLS: Why Iyanla Believes Colorism Leaves Scars on a Woman's Soul Read more: http://www.oprah.com/own-lightgirls/Why-Iyanla-Believes-Colorism

When a young girl is confronted with colorism—regardless of her skin tone—spiritual teacher Iyanla Vanzant believes that experience leaves "scars on the soul" that last well into adulthood. In the documentary Light Girls, African-American actresses and media personalities born with lighter complexions recount painful childhood memories. Actress Cynthia McWilliams says she was affected by colorism at a very young age. "I was made to feel that something about what I had or looked like was somehow both special and yet disliked, hated," she says. "[It was] something to be embraced and/or fear." Similarly, actress Essence Atkins says she felt a lot of shame about being light and having long hair when she was a girl. "The lightness of my skin didn't insulate me from questioning my worthiness of being black," she says. In the video above, more women discuss the misconception that light-skinned women are "stuck up" or "acting white." Tune in Monday, January 19, at 9/8c. Read more: http://www.oprah.com/own-lightgirls/Why-Iyanla-Believes-Colorism-Leaves-Scars-on-a-Womans-Soul-Video#ixzz3OvcXzkuh

Hollywood and Colorism

Hollywood is often criticized for its casting choices, with many believing that lighter-skinned actresses are given preference over darker-skinned actresses. In the documentary “Light Girls,” Chris Spencer (co-creator of “Real Husbands of Hollywood”), Raven-Symoné (That's So Raven) and other entertainers discuss how the opposite is sometimes true.

Oprah.com

LIGHT GIRLS: Why Actresses Like Raven-Symoné Tanned Their Skin to Appear Darker Read more: http://www.oprah.com/own-lightgirls/Why-Actresses-Like-Ra

Hollywood is often criticized for its casting choices, with many believing that lighter-skinned actresses are given preference over darker-skinned actresses. In the documentary Light Girls, Chris Spencer (Real Husbands of Hollywood), Raven-Symoné (That's So Raven) and other entertainers discuss how the opposite is sometimes true. "When I had my own show, I used to tan three or four times a week in a tanning bed to get darker," Raven-Symoné says. Ralph Farquhar, producer of popular sitcoms like The Parkers and Moesha, admits that skin color often plays a role in casting. "A lot of times, you know, we might be in a situation where we want to make sure we cast a dark-skinned girl, so we're passing up the light-skinned sisters," he says. "You might have a very talented actress who's being, you know, overlooked because of her complexion." Watch as actress Erica Hubbard shares her personal experience with colorism. Tune in Monday, January 19, at 9/8c. Read more: http://www.oprah.com/own-lightgirls/Why-Actresses-Like-Raven-Symone-Tanned-Their-Skin-Video#ixzz3Oveu5fC4

About "Light Girls"

From the creator and director of the critically acclaimed documentary “Dark Girls,” award-winning filmmaker Bill Duke continues the conversation on colorism with "Light Girls.” Sharing the untold stories and experiences of lighter-skinned women, “Light Girls” dives deep into the discussion of skin color, preference, privilege, pain and prejudice. The documentary unravels the lost pages of history to find the origins of colorism, racial self-hatred and the ideal standards of beauty, and takes viewers on a journey through time and story, seeking to both heal and unite light and dark women from all walks of life throughout the world.

For more information, visit oprah.com