Hip fractures are deadly for many seniors

CNN/Stylemagazine.com Newswire | 5/13/2019, 5:39 p.m.
The news an elderly relative has broken a hip tends to sound alarm bells, perhaps more than breaking another bone ...
The news an elderly relative has broken a hip tends to sound alarm bells, perhaps more than breaking another bone would. That's because a hip fracture dramatically increases an older person's risk of death.

Originally Published: 13 MAY 19 17:17 ET

By Sharon Brennan-Olsen, The Conversation

(CNN) -- The news an elderly relative has broken a hip tends to sound alarm bells, perhaps more than breaking another bone would. That's because a hip fracture dramatically increases an older person's risk of death.

One in three adults aged 50 and over dies within 12 months of suffering a hip fracture. Older adults have a five-to-eight times higher risk of dying within the first three months of a hip fracture compared to those without a hip fracture. This increased risk of death remains for almost ten years.

Beyond suffering pain, a hip fracture results in a loss of physical function, decreased social engagement, increased dependence, and worse quality of life. Many people who have a hip fracture need to change their living conditions, such as relocating from their home into a residential aged care facility.

Ultimately, the often rapid regression of an older person's health following a hip fracture means outcomes are poor.

Risk factors for hip fractures

Age is a key risk factor, with hip fractures more likely to occur in those aged 65 or older. They're primarily a result of a fall, or when the hip collides with a solid object such as a kitchen bench. However, they can also occur when there has been little or no trauma, such as standing up.

Cognitive impairment such as dementia is a common factor that increases the risk of falling. Frailty, poor vision, the use of a combination of medications, and trip hazards in the home also increase the likelihood of falls. Osteoporosis, a disease characterised by low bone mass and degradation of bone tissue, is another significant risk factor for hip fractures.

Osteoporosis and osteopenia (where bone mass is lower than normal, but not yet osteoporotic) are reported to affect more than one million Australians aged 65 and older. Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men experience a fracture caused by such bone fragility, with a fracture occurring every three seconds. Compared to a fracture of any other bone, a hip fracture results in the most serious of all consequences.

While the reasons remain unclear, hip fractures also disproportionately affect those at the disadvantaged end of the social scale.

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Previous research has reported around 30% of people with hip fractures have had a prior fracture; this is known as the "fracture cascade". The increased risk of subsequent fracture may persist for ten years, which highlights the importance of treating the initial fracture promptly and effectively.

Increased risk of death

In Australia, standard clinical care following a hip fracture begins with timely assessment, including X-rays, and pain and cognitive assessments. Australian data indicate more than three-quarters of people who sustain a hip fracture undergo surgery, the most common procedure being a joint replacement. Surgical intervention will generally occur within 48 hours.

But some patients may prefer not to undergo surgery. Or, their medical team may determine the risks are too great to expose the person to surgery.