Nick Cannon's planned daytime talk show is pushed back amid anti-Semitism controversy

CNN/Stylemagazine.com Newswire | 7/20/2020, 1:47 p.m.
Nick Cannon's planned daytime talk show has been pushed back in the wake of recent backlash over his anti-Semitic comments.
In the midst of recent backlash over his anti-Semitic comments, Nick Cannon sounded off about the reaction to his apology for those remarks./Credit: Tiffany Rose/Getty Images for Lupus LA

By Lisa Respers France, CNN

(CNN) -- Nick Cannon's planned daytime talk show has been pushed back in the wake of recent backlash over his anti-Semitic comments.

The news was announced in a joint statement from Lionsgate and Debmar-Mercury provided to CNN on Friday.

According to the statement, "The 'Nick Cannon' talk show will not debut this year."

"After conversations with Nick, we do believe that his public comments don't reflect his true feelings and his apology is heartfelt and sincere," the statement read. "We want to continue the healing process as he meets with leaders of the Jewish community and engages in a dialogue with our distribution partners to hear their views."

The statement went on to say, "We are standing by Nick in our hope that by fall 2021 he will be able to use his extraordinary talent and platform to entertain, enlighten and unite his audience on the 'Nick Cannon' talk show."

"Lionsgate and Debmar-Mercury condemn anti-Semitism, racism and hate speech," it concluded. "It runs counter to everything we stand for."

It was just the latest development in the controversy.

Early Friday, Cannon sounded off about the reaction to his apology for those remarks.

He tweeted, "I hurt an entire community and it pained me to my core, I thought it couldn't get any worse."

"Then I watched my own community turn on me and call me a sell-out for apologizing," the tweet went on to say. "Goodnight. Enjoy Earth."

He then added, "Y'all can have this planet. I'm out!"

The controversy

ViacomCBS ended a decades-long relationship with Cannon this week after he was joined by controversial hip hop figure Professor Griff on a recent episode of the "Cannon's Class" podcast, where talk turned to Black people as the "true Hebrews" and included anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

In 1989 Griff was briefly kicked out of the rap group Public Enemy after he made anti-Semitic comments, but later rejoined the group as its ''supreme allied chief of community relations," according to a New York Times article from that year.

During his appearance on Cannon's podcast, Griff doubled down on his past comments and said he was "hated now because I told the truth."

Cannon said that Griff was "speaking facts" and amplified Griff's views that Jewish people controlled the media, likening it to the power of the Rothschild family, banking scions who have long been targets of anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

"The Masked Singer" host also disputed that such views were anti-Semitic, saying Black people are the "true Hebrews."

"It's never hate speech. You can't be anti-Semitic when we are the Semitic people," he said. "When we are the same people who they want to be. That's our birthright. We are the true Hebrews."

On Monday Cannon posted a series of tweets about the controversy, writing "Anyone who knows me knows that I have no hate in my heart nor malice intentions."

"I do not condone hate speech nor the spread of hateful rhetoric," he wrote. "We are living in a time when it is more important than ever to promote unity and understanding."