Why You Should Want to Vote

Jo-Carolyn Goode | 7/3/2020, 4:09 a.m.
George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Elijah McClain, Sandra Bland, Trayvon Martin, just the mention of their names alone ought ...

George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Elijah McClain, Sandra Bland, Trayvon Martin, just the mention of their names alone ought to be enough to make you want to vote. When there are areas of town populated by Black and Brown people that lack adequate places to grocery shop, obtain healthcare, and play in parks than other areas of town populated by mainly Caucasian ought to be enough to make you want to vote. When the leader of the free world doesn’t even try to hide his bigotry towards other ethnicities, the poor, or tries to dismantle everything his predecessor did ought to be enough to make you want to vote. The fact that you stand on the shoulders living the dream of those gone by who fought, bleed, and cried for you to have that right to vote ought to be enough to make you want to vote.

The Constitution of the United States of America, as defined on WhiteHouse.gov, is the supreme law of the United States. Drafted “to create a government with enough power to act on a national level, but without so much power that fundamental rights would be at risk.” When it came to voting rights in America the founding fathers described how we would vote but did not define who would vote and who would not vote. That decision was left up to the states. However, this proved problematic for the states when electing Senators and those to the House of Representatives. The passage of the 17th amendment declared all senatorial elections would be done by a popular vote. The first popular vote, which is the result of all votes casted in a particular general election, occurred in 1914. Your vote counts in the popular vote since it is a winner takes all when it comes to electing senators.

However, the Electoral College elects the President of the United States. So when you vote for the President and Vice President of the United States you are not actually electing them but are electing others known as electors to vote for them. Electors are selected by their states.

There are over 500 electors in the Electoral College.

Before you think, your vote doesn’t count think again.

A Matter of Safety

COVID-19 has made voting different this year. Polling locations have been equipped to make voting as safe as possible. All are required to wear masks upon entering. Hand sanitizer is provided to clean your hands before and after voting. Voters are given finger covering to have contactless voting. Voters are also given disinfectant wipes to wipe down machines before usage. Plus, if you vote early you will come in contact with less people. And curbside voting is available for those who maybe ill.

All poll workers are outfitted with PPEs and will be able to provide masks to voters who don’t have them. Voting machines are spaced six feet apart as well as markers are in place for when voters have to stand in line.

Where to Vote

The polls are open. Please wear your mask and bring proper identification. The Texas Secretary of the State has said that any registered and eligible voters may vote at any early voting location located in the county of residence. On Election Day any registered and eligible voters may vote at any voting location located in the county of residence since Harris, Fort Bend, and Brazoria counties participate in the Countywide Polling Place Program.

Harris County

Early Voting

*Now-July 2, 2020

7am -7pm

*July 5, 2020

10am-7pm

*July 6-10, 2020

7am-7pm

Election Day

*July 14, 2020

7am – 7pm

Fort Bend County

Early Voting

*Now-July 2, 2020

8am -7pm

*July 5, 2020

12pm-5pm

*July 6-10, 2020

7am-7pm

Election Day

*July 14, 2020

7am – 7pm

Brazoria County

Early Voting

*Now-July 2, 2020

8am -5pm

*July 5, 2020

1pm-6pm

*July 6-10, 2020

7am-7pm

Election Day *July 14, 2020

7am – 7pm